Homage to Piet Mondrian

For those who don’t know the name, you may recognise a signature look. Piet Mondrian (1872-1944) was an influential Dutch painter and art theorist especially with his work of the 1920s and 1930s. Excerpts of examples of his work follow.

The power of primary colours offset by the starkness of white and black is instantly memorable. His paintings work to harmonise contrasts.

But what has this artist’s work to do with Tasmania? Wherein lays the ‘tasmanian discovery’?

Travel about 80 kms north-east of Hobart to Orford, on Tasmania’s east coast, to see a home owner/builder embracing the conceptual nature of Mondrian’s work and to appreciate the inherent possibilities for drama and sense of vitality in a home residence. This is not the work of a copier of any one piece of Mondrian’s work; rather the combinations and structure of the colour on the home’s frontage have been designed to reflect the home owner’s appreciation of the general spirit of his work. This configuration and choice of colour are unique and stand clearly as the owners’ intellectual property.

From the vantage point of nearby Raspins Beach, the strong colours attract attention at distance even through tall trees.

The house is beside the north bound highway, and you will drive past it a short while after crossing the Prosser River at Orford when heading towards Triabunna. The brave front of this house is a reminder to us all that we should step away from the familiar and the tried and true, at least in some parts of our lives. In this case, a few cans of paint have been all that was needed to demonstrate an adventurous spirit, and to bring wonderful colour into our lives.

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2 Responses to Homage to Piet Mondrian

  1. wilfredbooks says:

    I love abstract art, and Mondrian is one of my favourite exponents. Cheers, Jon.

    Like

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