A mosaic mural

Friend artist Chantale Delrue has used the past months wisely for an ‘iso project’. During that time she used her experience, gained in producing mosaics for governments and others over the past few decades, to cut and position thousands of small tiles onto paper as her own personal project.

She measured an outdoor floor space at her home, onto which the tiles would be laid, glued and grouted. This allowed her to determine the finished shape and to understand the volume of tiles that would be required.

Then slowly and surely, she cut tile pieces to create small images as part of a whole, all the while remembering the complete design. Each tile was glued onto a sheet of paper. Each sheet of tiles was rested on its own sheet of cardboard and numbered.

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A master diagram showed the numbers of all the parts, to ensure the laying of the mosaic tiles proceeded with order.

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Once the cutting of the tiles was completed, a tiler was hired to mix the correct glue professionally while laying each section on the outside concrete deck.  The ungrouted mosaic appeared as follows:

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Chantale then took on the job of cleaning off excess glue before grouting the entire image.

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This massive undertaking has resulted in a stunning image; one which decorates the previously expansive plain concrete slab of her West Hobart home front patio.

Congrats Chantale!

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8 Responses to A mosaic mural

  1. Ross Thomas says:

    Wow, looks fabulous. Quite obviously a very talented lady !

    Like

  2. Megan Kube says:

    What a wonderful piece of work! Well done, Chantale!

    Like

  3. wilfredbooks says:

    Very impressive! It’s some talent to be able to conceive the overall design from all those small, individual pieces. Cheers, Jon.

    Like

    • I couldnt agree more. She worked in her very crowded studio and once she had the space measurements she had to work only in sections; its a brilliant cognitive activity to hold it all in the brain and know the way each piece and each section would relate. Like you I am super impressed.

      Like

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