Bruny Island 7 of 15

It was difficult to think while watching the stony walls of the stony world pass by. The atmosphere of the day and the grandness of the sea and land was overwhelming.

Jeanette’s photos below show the structure of one area and give an idea of the continuing magnitude of those walls. The appearance of those walls was never the same from moment to moment.    20190413_103859.jpg

20190413_103905.jpg

20190413_103916.jpg

20190413_103939.jpgWatch Jeanette’s video to appreciate how we looked in our red protective wear, how we moved around the craft to experience the rocky cliff faces, the kelp, and the water.

After the event I was very happy with the entire experience.  At the time, during the voyage, the explosion of ideas in my mind and the assault on all my senses made forming an opinion irrelevant ; it didn’t occur to me to think about how I felt.  Simply I was absorbing and feeling that world aided by the changing light and the multitude of sounds.20190413_104113.jpgIn the photo above I looked padded up. I was. Beneath the red overall, I was wearing two thermal tops, a fleecy jumper, and a wind-chill proof jacket, neck warmer, gloves, and beanie.  Despite all these layers I was very cold by the time we returned to Adventure Bay.

We motored around a headland and up to a sheltered stony beach in a tiny bay below rocky outcrops.  Jeanette’s photos give some sense of the isolation and rawness of this place.  UK stony beach with arrow.jpg

20190413_110338.jpg

20190413_110353.jpg Nearby was a clearly articulated fissure in the rocks where a hole had already been carved by the sea.  In a few thousand years or more that arch will collapse creating an island off shore.20190413_110411.jpg

20190413_112811.jpgWe had no appreciation of the distance we would cover. From the position of this stony beach I looked southward to see many headlands  jutted into the sea; or another way of expressing this view is to say, from this point looking southward I could see many bays and inlets had been created from erosion and rock collapse.  The land was losing ground to the powerful ocean.20190413_110447_001.jpgLooking northwards in the direction from which we came, a similarly created landscape was evident.  Again, notice how calm the sea was in Jeanette’s photo below.20190413_111535.jpgWhat a perfect day it was to be at sea.

This entry was posted in Tasmania. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s